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Redirect After Javascript



i created a simple login that the user will fill in and after successfullylogin he will redirectly go another page that has a message login successful, Now my problem is after the user redirect to the login success massage page is there a way to set 3seconds on that page and after that the user will go back to home page after 3 seconds? hope you can help me. Thanks




redirect after javascript


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While your users generally won't be able to tell the difference between the different types of redirects, Google Search uses redirects as a strong or weak signal that the redirect target should be canonical. Choosing a redirect depends on how long you expect the redirect will be in place and what page you want Google Search to show in search results:


The following table explains the various ways you can use to set up permanent and temporary redirects, ordered by how likely Google is able to interpret correctly (for example, a server side redirect has the highest chance of being interpreted correctly by Google). Choose the redirect type that works for your situation and site:


Setting up server-side redirects requires access to the server configuration files (for example, the .htaccess file on Apache) or setting the redirect headers with server-side scripts (for example, PHP). You can create both permanent and temporary redirects on the server side.


If you need to change the URL of a page as it is shown in search engine results, we recommend that you use a permanent server-side redirect whenever possible. This is the best way to ensure that Google Search and people are directed to the correct page. The 301 and 308 status codes mean that a page has permanently moved to a new location.


If you just want to send users to a different page temporarily, use a temporary redirect. This will also ensure that Google keeps the old URL in its results for a longer time. For example, if a service your site offers is temporarily unavailable, you can set up a temporary redirect to send users to a page that explains what's happening, without compromising the original URL in search results.


Apache: Consult the Apache .htaccess Tutorial, the Apache URL Rewriting Guide, and the Apache mod_alias documentation. For example, you can use mod_alias to set up the simplest form of redirects:


If you can't implement any of the traditional redirect methods, you should still make an effort to let your users know that the page or its content has moved. The simplest way to do this is to add a link pointing to the new page accompanied by a short explanation. For example:


This helps users find your new site and Google may understand this as a crypto redirect, (like the Loch Ness monster, its existence may be disputed; not all search engines may recognize this pseudo-redirect as an official redirect).


When you redirect a URL, Google keeps track of both the redirect source (the old URL) and the redirect target (the new URL). One of the URLs will be the canonical; which one, depends on signals such as whether the redirect was temporary or permanent. The other URL becomes an alternate name of the canonical URL. Alternate names are different versions of a canonical URL that users might recognize and trust more. Alternate names may appear in search results when a user's query hints that they might trust the old URL more.


I'm using $.post() to call a servlet using Ajax and then using the resulting HTML fragment to replace a div element in the user's current page. However, if the session times out, the server sends a redirect directive to send the user to the login page. In this case, jQuery is replacing the div element with the contents of the login page, forcing the user's eyes to witness a rare scene indeed.


I read this question and implemented the approach that has been stated regarding setting the response HTTP status code to 278 in order to avoid the browser transparently handling the redirects. Even though this worked, I was a little dissatisfied as it is a bit of a hack.


I had a similar problem to yours. I perform an AJAX request that has 2 possible responses: one that redirects the browser to a new page and one that replaces an existing HTML form on the current page with a new one. The jQuery code to do this looks something like:


No browsers handle 301 and 302 responses correctly. And in fact the standard even says they should handle them "transparently" which is a MASSIVE headache for Ajax Library vendors. In Ra-Ajax we were forced into using HTTP response status code 278 (just some "unused" success code) to handle transparently redirects from the server...


The solution that was eventually implemented was to use a wrapper for the callback function of the Ajax call and in this wrapper check for the existence of a specific element on the returned HTML chunk. If the element was found then the wrapper executed a redirection. If not, the wrapper forwarded the call to the actual callback function.


I like Timmerz's method with a slight twist of lemon. If you ever get returned contentType of text/html when you're expecting JSON, you are most likely being redirected. In my case, I just simply reload the page, and it gets redirected to the login page. Oh, and check that the jqXHR status is 200, which seems silly, because you are in the error function, right? Otherwise, legitimate error cases will force an iterative reload (oops)


The problem (as many here already mentioned) is that the browser handles the redirect by itself wherefore my ajaxComplete callback got never called, but instead I got the response of the already redirected Login page which obviously was a status 200. The problem: how do you detect whether the successful 200 response is your actual login page or just some other arbitrary page??


Since I was not able to capture 302 redirect responses, I added a LoginPage header on my login page which contained the url of the login page itself. In the module I now listen for the header and do a redirect:


...and that works like charm :). You might wonder why I include the url in the LoginPage header...well basically because I found no way of determining the url of GET resulting from the automatic location redirect from the xhr object...


Finally at the client side check for such custom header. If present - full redirection to logon page should be done (in my case window.location is replaced by url from request which is handled automatically by my framework).


Another solution I found (especially useful if you want to set a global behaviour) is to use the $.ajaxsetup() method together with the statusCode property. Like others pointed out, don't use a redirect statuscode (3xx), instead use a 4xx statuscode and handle the redirect client-side.


Replace 400 with the statuscode you want to handle. Like already mentioned 401 Unauthorized could be a good idea. I use the 400 since it's very unspecific and I can use the 401 for more specific cases (like wrong login credentials). So instead of redirecting directly your backend should return a 4xx error-code when the session timed out and you you handle the redirect client-side. Works perfect for me even with frameworks like backbone.js


We're using WIF which is configured to redirect (passiveRedirectEnabled="true") on a 401 response. The redirect is usefull when handling normal requests but won't work for AJAX requests (since browsers won't execute the 302/redirect).


This allows you to return 401 responses for AJAX requests, which your javascript can then handle by reloading the page. Reloading the page will throw a 401 which will be handled by WIF (and WIF will redirect the user to the login page).


This problem may appear then using ASP.NET MVC RedirectToAction method. To prevent form displaying the response in div you can simply do some kind of ajax response filter for incomming responses with $.ajaxSetup. If the response contains MVC redirection you can evaluate this expression on JS side. Example code for JS below:


I had a similar problem to yours. I perform an ajax request that has 2 possible responses: one that redirects the browser to a new page and one that replaces an existing HTML form on the current page with a new one.


While the answers seem to work for people if you're using Spring Security I have found extending LoginUrlAuthenticationEntryPoint and adding specific code to handle AJAX more robust. Most of the examples intercept all redirects not just authentication failures. This was undesirable for the project I work on. You may find the need to also extend ExceptionTranslationFilter and override the "sendStartAuthentication" method to remove the caching step if you don't want the failed AJAX request cached.


I wanted clients to be redirected to the login page for any rest-action that is sent without an authorization token. Since all of my rest-actions are Ajax based, I needed a good generic way to redirect to the login page instead of handling the Ajax success function.


I was having this problem on a django app I'm tinkering with (disclaimer: I'm tinkering to learn, and am in no way an expert). What I wanted to do was use jQuery ajax to send a DELETE request to a resource, delete it on the server side, then send a redirect back to (basically) the homepage. When I sent HttpResponseRedirect('/the-redirect/') from the python script, jQuery's ajax method was receiving 200 instead of 302. So, what I did was to send a response of 300 with:


I wrote this code to handle a 500 page expired error, but it should work just as well to trap a 200 redirect. Ready the wikipedia entry on XMLHttpRequest onreadystatechange about the meaning of readyState.


Update1I found that I needed to add the option (always-use-default-target="true") to the form-login config.This was needed since after an AJAX request gets redirected to the login page (due to expired session), Spring remembers the previous AJAX request and auto redirects to it after login. This causes the returned JSON to be displayed on the browser page. Of course, not what I want. 041b061a72


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